Studies

Sperm Quality Improvement in ProteX 

Physiological and Biochemical Assessment of a New Semen Collection Device

Continued Evaluation of a New Semen Collection Technique / Container in Subfertile and Infertile Individuals Using a Cross-species Model

New Semen Collection Technique / Container Improves Semen Quality

Improving Semen Quality Using a Modified Collection Technique

A Novel Collection Technique for Improved Semen Quality

ProteX Thermal Properties

Improvement of the Semen Collection Environment Using a New Semen Collection Device

Conception with ProteX

Pregnancy Trials Using the Device for Improved Semen Collection

Early Fertility Trials of Semen Collection Device Previously Demonstrated to Improve Semen Parameters and Pregnancy Rates in Animal Models

ProteX Original Research     |     Animal Study

Pregnancy Trials Using the Device for Improved Semen Collection

Authors

Samuel Prien2, 3, Clay Dehn1, Kory Evenson3, Lindsay Penrose2, Lisa Welch3.
  1. Umbrella Corporation, San Antonio, TX
  2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX
  3. Department of Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX

Publication

Fertility and Sterility Vol. 106, Issue 3 Supplement. Published in issue: September 2016 – poster presentation.

Objective

It is well documented that sperm undergo significant physiological and biochemical processes, many of them brought on by changes in the environment at ejaculation. While the preponderance of the individual changes can be seen as positive and necessary for fertilization, collectively they set the cell on course for its eventual death. Previous research from this laboratory has demonstrated that modification of the collection environment using the Device for Improved Semen Collection (DISC), can lead to a delay in certain activation pathways and help provide a better quality sample for treatment procedures. A small human trial demonstrated superior semen parameters and equivalent pregnancy rates. The present study presents pregnancy data in two controlled trials in domestic animal species.

Design

Controlled prospective trial.

Materials and Methods

Two large scale pregnancy trials were conducted with the DISC in the equine and bovine. In both trials, semen was collected from the males in a real-time split collection where approximately half of the ejaculate was collected into the DISC or an appropriate control. Semen parameters were measured manually at the time of collection and time of insemination. In the equine trial mares were inseminated at ovulation with semen 24, 48, or 72 hours old to mimic industry practice (49 total inseminations). In the bovine, 43 females were divided for insemination with semen from either control or DISC collections. Inseminations were timed to occur 12 hours after semen collection using industry standard techniques. Pregnancy was determined by ultrasound.

Results

Semen parameters were similar between controls and DISC samples at collection (p = 0.832). Further, as expected all parameters decrease with time (p < 0.01). However, semen collected in the DISC retained more motility at all other time points: Bull (p < 0.002) and Stallion (p < 0.001). Pregnancy rates in the mares were similar between treatments at 24 hours, but higher at both 48 and 72 hours (p < 0.001). Pregnancy rates in cattle trended higher in animals inseminated with DISC semen (p = 0.06).

Conclusions

Data continue to indicate semen collected in the DISC provides higher quality cells for reproductive purposes. Further, pregnancy rates appear higher in animals bred with semen from the DISC. Additional research is warranted to confirm these findings.

Supported by

TTU Office of Research Commercialization.

Figure 1

Conception Rates in commercial cattle

Figure 1 - Conception Rates in commercial cattle. Part of an animal study showing improved semen collection.
A commercial trial of conception rates in cattle using semen collected in the DISC (Treatment) vs. industry standard collection techniques (Control). Data suggests higher pregnancy rates from semen collected in DISC (p < 0.02).

Insights

Large scale pregnancy trials were undertaken in both equine and bovine models using species-specific versions of ProteX (TruBreed). In a herd of 43 commercial cattle females, pregnancy rate increased from 50% with traditional methods to over 70% using ProteX. Across six proven bull sires, only one had higher conception rates using traditional methods.

Figure 2

Conception rates by Bull in a Commercial Cattle herd

Figure 2 - Conception rates by Bull in a Commercial Cattle herd.
A controlled trial of conception rates of cattle using semen collected in the DISC (Treatment) vs. the industry standard collection techniques (Control). Data for individual bulls demonstrated a trend toward higher conception rates with semen from the DISC (p < 0.06) and a higher conception rate among all animals bred (p < 0.01).

Figure 3

Conception Rates Over Time – equine

Figure 3 - Conception Rates Over Time - equine.
A controlled trial of conception rates of horses using semen collected in the DISC (Treatment) vs. Industry Standard Collection Techniques (Control). Data suggest both a higher pregnancy rate in all animals bred with semen after 24 hours. (p < 0.001) and a higher cumulative rate from all breedings (p < 0.001).

Insights

It is standard practice in the horse-breeding industry to not use semen that is over 24 hours old due to the rapid decline of sperm quality. This is observed in the steady drop of conception rate in the control arm. This is contrasted by the observation from semen collected in the DISC, which saw a steady increase in conception rate over time and a significantly higher conception rate compared to control.

Direct insights into the research, methodology, and results have been added to this summary by the co-inventors themselves. This additional information is intended to provide helpful context to professional practitioners and does not fundamentally change the outcomes or interpretation of the published results. All ProteX research content and material is the property of Reproductive Solutions and may not be redistributed or republished without our consent. All rights reserved.